The UK’s only national book store, Waterstones, had big plans to develop its own reading device to compete with Amazon. Today it’s unveiled its plan…a partnership with Amazon! Not quite what people were expecting. The CEO of Waterstones, James Daunt, looks pretty unexcited – not to say beaten – in the launch video:

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This is lovely, from the British Psychology Society’s website: Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago, yet in his understanding of mental distress he is a very modern writer, argues Caroline Cupitt. Take David Copperfield, the novel that Dickens himself described as his ‘favourite child’. By the time David is 10, having already seen more of Read more…

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I read Geoff Dyer’s book, The Zone, last week. As ever with Dyer’s books, it’s interesting, slightly infuriating, slightly head-scratching…Is it genius? Is it silly? I don’t know. What it is, is a book about Andrei Tarkovsky’s 1979 slow, philosophical and quasi-religious film, Stalker, which in turn is about three people who travel through a Read more…

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I picked up Philip Pullman’s book The Golden Compass one evening a few weeks ago, and was immediately engrossed, to the point where I had to re-read the next two books in the Dark Materials trilogy. I was reminded of everything I loved about the books: Pullman deftly connects some fascinating ideas from contemporary physics, Read more…

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The British arts and culture sector is in a flap. The Office of National Statistics is about to finish its consultation defining the domains of well-being, and guess what…arts and culture aren’t in there! Shit! Cue some desperate lobbying of the ONS to make sure they include arts and culture in their official definition of Read more…

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