I’ve just been at a three-day seminar at the Institute for Government, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, to help academics learn how to influence public policy. The seminar brought together 15 academics in disciplines ranging from literary criticism to design and urban planning.The IFG arranged an impressive line-up of Westminster big-wigs to Read more…

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The eagle-eyed among you will have noticed there was no newsletter last weekend. Apologies. The reason for this is I have journeyed deep into the warm, pulsating heart of the happiness movement. Last Thursday I took part in a conference on Positive Psychology at Wellington College (the pioneer of well-being classes), and then I went Read more…

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Psychodynamic therapists of the world, rejoice! After years of complaining that CBT sucks up all the public funding, it seems that psychodynamic therapists may be about to get a break – in Sweden at least. For the last four years or so, Sweden’s government has put substantial funds (around £200 million according to one source) Read more…

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Radio 4′s Moral Maze this week looked at the government’s expansion of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), and at a new report from Lord Richard Layard of the LSE (the principal arranger of the government’s embrace of CBT), which warns that local and national governments are failing to honour the spending commitments they made to CBT. Read more…

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One of the interesting things about the politics of well-being is how, in the UK, it began as a movement on the Left, through figures like Geoff Mulgan (the head of Blair’s policy unit), and Richard Layard, but then managed to cross over and become a cross-party consensus, both in the Lib Dems (through people Read more…

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