This year I got some funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council to teach a course in practical philosophy with three partner organizations – Manor Gardens, a mental health charity in North London; Low Moss prison in Glasgow; and Saracens rugby club. The courses teach practical ideas from various wisdom traditions, and how they’ve Read more…

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Yesterday, Tony Little, the headmaster of my old school Eton College, gave evidence to the All-Party Parliamentary Committee on Social Mobility at a special summit on ‘character and resilience’. These traits have been outlined by the Committee as the ‘missing link’ in social mobility. And supposedly, public schools like Eton and Wellington are particularly good Read more…

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I’m writing this from the Hay-On-Wye book festival, where the rain is coming down piteously, maintaining a steady rhumba on the roofs of the marquees. There are actually two festivals here – the main one, sponsored by the Telegraph, which is rather blue-rinse; and How The Light Gets In, which is a philosophy festival. The Read more…

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One of the interesting things about the politics of well-being is how, in the UK, it began as a movement on the Left, through figures like Geoff Mulgan (the head of Blair’s policy unit), and Richard Layard, but then managed to cross over and become a cross-party consensus, both in the Lib Dems (through people Read more…

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Here’s Brigadier General Rhonda Cornum, one of the people in my book, being interviewed on British Forces News about the US Army’s resilience training programme. That’s me 30 seconds in, looking sceptical in the audience!

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